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Radiator Valves - What's the best choice for you?

Radiator Valves are available in three basic orientations:
  • Angled
    Angled valve example
  • Straight
    Straight valve example
  • Corner
    Corner valve example

and two functional types:

  • Thermostatic
    Thermostatic valve example Thermostatic valve example
  • Manual
    Manual Valve Example Manual Valve Example

Radiator valves can go with any type of radiator, you can find the different styles of radiator here
Heated Towel Rails | Designer Radiator | Cast Iron Radiators | Column Radiators

The right valve for the task

Choosing the right valve depends on the positioning of the valve inlet on any given radiator.


Inlets can be on the bottom of the radiator (fig.1) or the side of the radiator (fig.2). Inlet position should be easy to ascertain from a radiator image, however, if in doubt do not hesitate to contact us on 0844 358 1995.


Choosing also heavily depends on what function you require from your valves. Building regulations strongly suggest that you have TRVs installed on your system for efficiency and cost effectiveness and if all the radiators have TRVs you will also require an automatic bypass valve to prevent valve hammer and velocity whistling. That said manual valves are perfectly acceptable if you have decent boiler thermostatic control and often a preferred method for installers to provide manual system bypasses (i.e. a system includes both trvs and manual valves).


One final consideration would be to ensure you choose valve pairs with an actual lock-shield (fig.3) component. Lock-shields prevent the average radiator user from permanently adjusting your heating system's balance. Poor system balance can lead to radiators that just don't warm up, and others that get all the heat. A lock-shield is set once by your installer and then requires a tool (generally an Allen key) to adjust it in the future.
  • Downward facing inlets
    fig.1
  • Side facing inlets
    fig.2
  • Chrome lock-shield valve
    fig.3

Angled Valves

Angled valves are probably the most common orientation found in homes. They are labelled as angled valves because the flow of water is angled by 90° within the valve body.
  • With Side Inlets on a radiator these valves can be used to accept pipework coming from;
    • below, ideal because the valve head sits in-line with radiator & wall (fig.4)
    • behind, not ideal because the valve head projects into the room (fig.5)
  • With Bottom Inlets on a radiator these valves can be used to accept pipework coming from;
    • behind, not ideal because the valve head projects into the room (fig.6)
    • side on, ideal because the valve head is in-line with the radiator & wall, but a very rarely found configuration(fig.7)
  • Angled valves on side facing inlets pipes from floor
    fig.4
  • Angled valves on side facing inlets pipes from wall
    fig.5
  • Angled valves on downward facing inlets pipes from wall
    fig.6
  • Angled valves on downward facing inlets pipes from side on
    fig.7

Straight Valves

Straight valves are not very common, but in some cases are essential. They are labelled as straight valves because the direction of flow of water is not changed within the valve body. Often installers will use these rather than an angled pair and end up leaving a lot of copper on show that cannot easily be hidden because bends have been created in the copper pipework. This leaves an unsightly set-up that should be avoided at all costs.
  • With Side Inlets on a radiator these valves can be used to accept pipework coming from;
    • side on, ideal because the valve head sits in-line with radiator & wall (fig.8)
  • With Bottom Inlets on a radiator these valves can be used to accept pipework coming from;
    • below, ideal because the valve head can be positioned to sit in-line with radiator & wall (fig.9)
  • Straight valves on side facing inlets pipes from the side
    fig.8
  • Straight valves on downward facing inlets pipes from the floor
    fig.9

Corner Valves

Corner valves are a relatively new invention. You may find these sometimes referred to as double angled valves. The flow of water is angled by 90°, much like a standard angled valve, but the head is positioned 90° from both the inlet and the outlet, adding a third dimension to its orientation. This was done to provide an ideal alternative to some of the not ideal angled valve set-ups.
  • With Side Inlets on a radiator these valves can be used to accept pipework coming from;
    • behind, ideal because the valve head sits in-line with the radiator & the wall (fig.10)
  • With Bottom Inlets on a radiator these valves can be used to accept pipework coming from;
    • behind, ideal because the valve head sits in-line with the radiator & the wall (fig.11)
  • Corner valves on side facing inlets pipes from the wall
    fig.10
  • Corner valves on downward facing inlets pipes from the wall
    fig.11

Sleeve Kits

You can get the best possible finish for any of these combinations of valve installation using our sleeve kits. They come in a range of matching finishes and have two length options to cater to exact needs. Constructed from Brass so they never rust, perfect for towel rail and radiator installations.

Sleeve kit example

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